"But there was nothing about the little, low-rambling, more or less identical homes of Northumberland Estates to interest or to haunt, no chance of loot that would be any more than the ordinary, waking-world kind the cops hauled you in for taking; no small immunities, no possibilities for hidden life or otherworldly presence; no trees, secret routes, shortcuts, culverts, thickets that could be made hollow in the middle – everything in the place was right out in the open, everything could be seen at a glance; and behind it, under it, around the corners of its houses and down the safe, gentle curves of its streets, you came back, you kept coming back, to nothing; nothing but the cheerless earth."
Thomas Pynchon, "The Secret Integration"

This is Ian Mathers' Tumblr. I live in Canada. I've written about music and other things for Stylus, Dusted, PopMatters, Resident Advisor, the Village Voice, and a few other places. Hi.

imathers@gmail.com

 

The sense of encountering a gobsmacking supernatural event is very powerful. And what interests me about that is that it all has to be accomplished by some real-world method. It can’t just be imagined, it has to be created. So yes, I think there’s exactly that connection for me. One of the reasons I tend to like Hitchcock and the other guys who are so skilled in montage is that they take shot A and shot B, and that little shot between them is where the impossible happens. That moment of the cut is where the explosion happens in your brain. You’re watching all these little connective pieces of film, but where the movie is happening is between them all.

Teller, as interviewed by Noel Murray, for The Dissolve, 2014. (via aintgotnoladytronblues)

Participate in a Survey About Gender Diversity in Video Games

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

The <title> of this page is “Do Consumers Want More Women In Video Games?” The results of this survey will be presented at GDC15, so let’s tell ‘em a resounding “FUCK YEAH!”

Please reblog! 

Please fill this out if you play video games.

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover
by Rohan Kriwaczek
During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.
"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.

This is hitting a lot of The Crying of Lot 49 buttons for me (surely The  Courier&#8217;s Tragedy is the best bit?).

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover

by Rohan Kriwaczek

During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.

"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.

This is hitting a lot of The Crying of Lot 49 buttons for me (surely The  Courier’s Tragedy is the best bit?).

post-prufrock asked
Hi Crystal! I'm sure like many white male writers who hears your podcast, my initial reaction to your indictment of male-centrism in the music criticism sphere was along the lines of "man, these girls are so right, those stats are scary...but I'M not part of the problem rite!?!?", which I then realized COULD be true but PROBABLY not. Can you think of anything us male writers can do to stop promoting this gross imbalance? Thanks, keep writing forever.

crystalleww:

A couple of caveats to what I’m about to say:

  • I have a full-time job unrelated to writing about music. This means my opinion is very colored. I’m allowed to do and say a lot in this space without fear of losing my next paycheck or access to health care.
  • As a result, I’m also fairly insulated from the day-to-day of music writing. I don’t actually know what it’s like to be a staff writer. I don’t like, have a lot of experience, a long-standing gig with a major publication or anything. I have no idea what the politics look like. I’m sure they’re not fun.

That being said, it always just comes down to being aware and being open. I’ve been very fortunate to write for The Singles Jukebox where my editors and staff actively listen (first step! prerequisite to everything!), work very hard to be aware, and take proactive steps to get better with women taking central roles in those initiatives. Our application process was giving us a lot of white dudes? Let’s rethink our strategy about it. The dudes on your website are crowding out the voices of women, speaking on behalf of women? Okay, let’s create an environment where your female writers don’t feel uncomfortable pointing out this is ridiculous. Our coverage was missing several gaps, especially around what is music that has been ignored by traditional music outlets? Okay, get women to pick artists and songs to cover.

For casual music writing and reading dudes, it’s important to look at your own biases, too:

  • Is your group of music writing friends all dudes? Great, you’ve got a problem. Fix it.
  • Are you primarily reading music writing done by white dudes? Okay, time to think of some new writers to follow. Read Rookie! Read The Toast! Read Hello Giggles! These should not be considered websites exclusively for girls or women. They should be required reading for everyone.
  • Did a woman call something you wrote sexist? What’s her tone? Nope, trick question — it doesn’t matter; your initial instinct will to be defensive, but you should listen and take it to heart and be better next time. 

It’s not the job of the woman to educate or inform. My friendships with women are very well documented online. Do the work and figure them out. And follow those women because they are brilliant, hilarious, thoughtful, fearless, and biting. You’ll find there are more of them than you think.

plavapticica:

languagethings:

wordfully:

imminentmoose:

I was reading the other day that it was believed that using the Proto-Indo-European word for bears (which evolved into the Latin ‘ursus’ and the Greek ‘arktos’) would summon one to wreck your shit, so the Germanic people speaking Old English would use ‘bruin’ or ‘brown one’ as a euphemism. The original word is now completely lost because of it.
Source

this is 100% true story.

in slavic languages, it was considered taboo to say bear as well, so lot’s of them replaced it with a variation of “медведь”&#160;: someone who eats honey. 

Ok but magic words are my fave thing about language ever, also unknowable words and Name magic (knowing someone’s name gives you power over them) and also Song as a way of keeping people alive or willing the dead back to life but literally not figuratively ( see lectures on Singing the Rug and also the hero obsession with fame)

This just speaks to me on a lot of levels.

plavapticica:

languagethings:

wordfully:

imminentmoose:

I was reading the other day that it was believed that using the Proto-Indo-European word for bears (which evolved into the Latin ‘ursus’ and the Greek ‘arktos’) would summon one to wreck your shit, so the Germanic people speaking Old English would use ‘bruin’ or ‘brown one’ as a euphemism. The original word is now completely lost because of it.

this is 100% true story.

in slavic languages, it was considered taboo to say bear as well, so lot’s of them replaced it with a variation of “медведь” : someone who eats honey. 

Ok but magic words are my fave thing about language ever, also unknowable words and Name magic (knowing someone’s name gives you power over them) and also Song as a way of keeping people alive or willing the dead back to life but literally not figuratively ( see lectures on Singing the Rug and also the hero obsession with fame)

This just speaks to me on a lot of levels.