"But there was nothing about the little, low-rambling, more or less identical homes of Northumberland Estates to interest or to haunt, no chance of loot that would be any more than the ordinary, waking-world kind the cops hauled you in for taking; no small immunities, no possibilities for hidden life or otherworldly presence; no trees, secret routes, shortcuts, culverts, thickets that could be made hollow in the middle – everything in the place was right out in the open, everything could be seen at a glance; and behind it, under it, around the corners of its houses and down the safe, gentle curves of its streets, you came back, you kept coming back, to nothing; nothing but the cheerless earth."
Thomas Pynchon, "The Secret Integration"

This is Ian Mathers' Tumblr. I live in Canada. I've written about music and other things for Stylus, Dusted, PopMatters, Resident Advisor, the Village Voice, and a few other places. Hi.

imathers@gmail.com

 

philtippett:

autistikeit: jenniferrpovey: jumpingjacktrash: becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys: ultrafacts: Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts






YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

This is amazing

philtippett:

autistikeit: jenniferrpovey: jumpingjacktrash: becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys: ultrafacts: Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

This is amazing

aintgotnoladytronblues:

after years of likewise willfully indiscriminate listening one thing i’ve learned is that it’s fun to decide what bands you’ll take as a serious concern and what ones you won’t and live fulfilled by your own arbitrariness as long as you love what you get out of them.

i have so many tshirts with the batman symbol on them despite not really caring about batman. it’s a cute logo and i love to look at it but i don’t have any interest in the stories that apparently matter to other people tied to it because those stories are boring as hell and my love for the aesthetic of it is enough for me. LOOK AT THE SIMPLE BATNESS OF IT. ISN’T THAT RADNESS AWESOME. seriously. that, and how cheap a lot of them are, is reason enough to own like five of them.

anyway, all that’s just to say there’s this one band that i have never felt the need to delve into long enough to make my memory of them a fuller or more, i dunno, lasting one, because it feels like to actually treat them seriously would be to ruin the perfect ~*~mystique~*~ of the totally superficial relationship i have with them where they only exist as this eternal nonsense riff that slips into the back of my head and makes me smile (this is sort of like what i was talking about with barrybailbondsman yesterday when she mentioned there’s apparently a new song out by bush because apparently that band still exists where i only know two lines of a bush song - “got a machine head, it’s better than the rest” - but i hum them regularly) and it’s just this chant of “fujiya, miyagi” repeated into the endless, except most of the time in my head it’s actually “issey, miyake” that they’re chanting instead.

after years of likewise willfully indiscriminate listening one thing i’ve learned is that it’s fun to decide what bands you’ll take as a serious concern and what ones you won’t and live fulfilled by your own arbitrariness as long as you love what you get out of them.

I’d say “everyone should do this” except we all already do this, but I’d certainly like some people to start realizing/accepting/embracing this very potent and joyful truth.